1932 ford roadster pickup – not your father’s truck!, fuel curve

1932 Ford Roadster Pickup – Not Your Father’s Truck!

“My dad was a diehard Oldsmobile guy,” said Matthew Gordon, owner of this phenomenal 1932 Ford Roadster Pickup. “I was more of a Ford guy. The only way you’d ever see those two together is in something like this.”

1932 ford roadster pickup – not your father’s truck!, fuel curve

That partially explains how this nostalgia-styled, Olds-powered 1932 Ford Roadster Pickup came together. The other component involves Jonathan Goolsby and his shop, Goolsby Customs. Matthew has known Jonathan a few years and the two often discussed collaborating on a project. When Jonathan found an unfinished Brookville ’32 roadster pickup on a rolling chassis – “just a bare blank project waiting for someone to finish it” – talk turned to action.

1932 ford roadster pickup – not your father’s truck!, fuel curve

The initial plan was a traditional-style build with a small-block Chevy, inspired in part by an Eric Black rendering of a closed-cab pickup. One thing nagged Matthew, though: “Everybody has seen the typical highboy with a small-block over and over,” he said. Matthew asked himself, “how are you going to make it different?” That’s when the Olds theme developed.

The heart of the concept is a 380c.i. ’57 Oldsmobile Rocket V8 built by Ross Racing Engines. It’s outfitted with aluminum heads, a Rochester Tri-power induction and custom-fabricated headers, and backed by a Bowler-prepped Tremec 5-speed. The combo rides in a Goolsby Customs-modified frame with a Currie rearend, dropped beam axle, RideTech front shocks and Kinmont-style disc brakes from Johnson’s Hot Rod Shop. The 16-inch wheels were rare Calnevar Chromesides trim rings with early-’50s Olds center caps and are wrapped in Firestone wide whitewalls from Coker.

1932 ford roadster pickup – not your father’s truck!, fuel curve

“Conceptually, we knew where we were headed,” Matthew said, though he and Goolsby called in artist Eric Black for good measure. Black illustrated three overall angles, though “most of the truck was done from one side view,” Matthew said. Key elements include channeling the body 2-inches, a custom box contoured to match the rear of the cab and, of course, those distinctive cycle-style fenders, crafted from ’37 Ford spare tire bands. The gorgeous color is a custom-mixed Glasurit hue dubbed Starfire Blue, inspired by ’50s-era Olds colors.

1932 ford roadster pickup – not your father’s truck!, fuel curve

Carrying the concept inside is a ’50 Olds gauge cluster, updated and restored by Classic Instruments, plus a custom-machined, small-scale ’53 Olds-wheel with a NOS horn button. Even the seat was inspired by ’50s-era sedans. M&M Hot Rod Interiors stitched the leather upholstery, while Advanced Plating handled the shiny work throughout the car.

1932 ford roadster pickup – not your father’s truck!, fuel curve

The 1932 Ford Roadster Pickup debuted at the Grand National Roadster Show and made an impact in the America’s Most Beautiful Roadster competition. It’s been impressing crowds ever since and will certainly bring some Olds-style, old-school flavor to the scene. It is also a finalist for Goodguys 2017 Scott’s Hot Rods Truck of the Year-Early

1932 ford roadster pickup – not your father’s truck!, fuel curve

Photography by Mike Harrington
Editor, Goodguys Gazette

Damon Lee began snapping photos at car shows when he was 10, tagging along with his father to events throughout the Midwest. He has combined his passion for cars and knack for writing and imagery into a 20-year career in the automotive aftermarket, writing for titles like Super Chevy and Rod & Custom and, more recently, working for respected industry leaders Speedway Motors and Goodguys Rod & Custom Association.

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