1937 ford roadster - ramon coria’s venom street rod, fuel curve

1937 Ford Roadster – Ramon Coria’s Venom Street Rod

By Roy Sorenson

Four years ago, Ramon Coria found a 1937 Ford roadster that someone had purchased but never started to build. His wife saw the car and instantly said, “I have been saving some money, and I’ll pay for the roller. It will be my gift to you for everything you have ever done for us.” Happy wife, happy life right?

1937 ford roadster - ramon coria’s venom street rod, fuel curve

Coria was beyond surprised to hear those words and immediately scheduled a visit to see the 1937 Ford Roadster. The trip was fruitful, and his dream car was now his, thanks to his amazing wife. Ramon knew he couldn’t finish the car on his own, and he didn’t want a big buck shop to finish it. This car was going to be completed in his garage! So with help from Dennis Sastini, the duo completed the car in three years. Ramon says Dennis was “key” in helping build the car. Since completion, the home built car seems to find the winner’s circle everywhere it goes.

1937 ford roadster - ramon coria’s venom street rod, fuel curve

Powering the 1937 Ford Roadster is a EFI crate LS3 backed by a 4L60E transmission. Rolling stock consists of 20”×10” Boyd wheels on the rear with matching 18”x8”s on the front shod with Nitto NT555 series tires. Keeping the rubber on the road is a Mustang II suspension system using tubular upper and lower control arms with RideTech’s Shockwave airbag/shock combination. Rear suspension consists of a triangulated four-link system also using Shockwaves to control ride height and road bumps. The airbags are controlled via an AccuAir E Level System with dual compressors and a large onboard air tank. A Currie Enterprises 9-inch third member and housing transfers the 400 horses to the pavement.

1937 ford roadster - ramon coria’s venom street rod, fuel curve

Ramon, Sastini, and Top Notch Upholstery (in San Jose, California) combined their talents for the interior. The seats are covered in leather and were customized to follow the contour of the top edge of the car.

A set of Classic Instruments gauges in three simple circles monitor things under the hood while keeping the dash clean and classy. Between the seats resides a custom-built center console wrapped in matching leather which houses the AccuAir controls and the Lokar shifter.

1937 ford roadster - ramon coria’s venom street rod, fuel curve

Passengers also get to enjoy a Kenwood head unit with built in screen and a back-up camera. The trunk is just as clean as the interior. A vintage cooler rides in the trunk painted to match the car. Both the trunk lid and hood can be raised or lowered with a remote key fob.

1937 ford roadster - ramon coria’s venom street rod, fuel curve

Speaking of under the hood, it’s just as clean as the rest of the car. The fuel injected LS3 features a little more horsepower due to a cam change, bigger injectors, and stainless steel headers/exhaust. Plus check out that air induction set up! The coil pack covers were painted to match the outside of the car.

So when we asked Ramon why he named the rod “Venom” he said, “I named it Venom because when I look at the front end it looks like it has fangs” After seeing our shots of the front of the car, we would have to agree.

1937 ford roadster - ramon coria’s venom street rod, fuel curve

Editor / Hot Cars Magazine

Roy has been a freelance photographer more then half his life. His is publisher/editor/chief photographer of Hot Cars. His works have been featured in Popular Cars, Scale Auto Enthusiast, Street Rodder, FineScale Modeler, Popular HotRodding, American Rodder, DRIVE, and more.  Roy has published three successful magazines in his life time with HOT CARS being his current love.

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