1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

1967 Chevy Stepside – East Bay Muscle Cars Builds a Hot Hauler

Steve Keefer of East Bay Muscle Cars and I had been trying to connect on this 1967 Chevy stepside shoot for a while. And after hanging out on a country road in the California Delta for an early morning session, I understand why he was so adamant. This thing is flawless.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

First off, Brad Brown’s 1967 Chevy step side is an amalgamation of the best Chevy had to offer in their late 60s, early 70s truck line. Steve calls it a ’67 but in reality, just the finely finished front end of Brown’s pickup is a ’67. The rest is ’70-’71 with mega custom mods all around. In that light, this is a full custom build and received the patented EBMC treatment – balanced perfectly, flaw-free sheet metal mods, perfect gaps and a track-inspired stance.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

Then you see the ass end. The taillight treatment has 60s custom overtones while at the same time looking very modern. The stock taillights were pretty much hideous on these trucks. They looked like school bus lights just stuck on as an afterthought. They were big and bulky and way too invasive. Keefer and his team solved that by Frenching and recessing scaled down units into the back of the fenders for a flush, clean look. It works and it’s the first time we recall seeing this technique.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

Speaking of first times, this is the first truck EBMC has ever produced. Known primarily for exquisite Pro-Touring builds, Brown’s pickup is the closest thing you can get to a Pro-Touring truck, ready to roll down the highway or tackle the track.


1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

When Brown delivered the truck two years ago, it was a “farm truck that was beat to hell.” Keefer asked Brown if he wanted them to make a fleetside bed for it but the answer was no. And staying true to the factory lines, we’re glad he did.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

EBMC made the visually-appealing front mesh grille insert and cleaned up the front end, heavily modded the bed including the cab/bed transition then rolled the back of the bed so it would flow seamlessly with the fenders. The bed floor was built from scratch with billet rails and a custom filler cap that looks like it belongs there! The tailgate latches are neatly tucked away out of sight and the rear roll pan is perfection, as we have come to expect from EBMC.

Is the truck black? Nope. It’s PPG Deep Blue Nightfall. Not so visible at dawn but catch it in the sunlight and it “blue’s up” real quick.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

The stance is variable. With adjustable RideTech coilovers, Brown can raise it up for road trips, then crank it down for canyon carving and AutoCross should he so desire. Being the first truck EBMC produced, the chassis was also a first for the progressive shop.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

They went with Speed Tech’s “Extreme Series” chassis which includes tubular control arms with billet upright spindles, and a Sweet Manufacturing steering rack. It’s affixed with a torque arm rear suspension set up, a Ford 9” housing 3.73:1 gears, and Wilwood 14” 6-piston brakes for dime stops. It’s no secret EBMC favors Forgeline wheels and these center lock “Grip Series” wheels in 19×10, and 20×12 are rolling art. Michelin Pilot Sports (345/30/20 and 285/35/19) give it good “stick.”

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

Following Steve out to Byron Hot Springs Road for our location shoot, we couldn’t help but smile at the sweet exhaust note. Yes it has an LS but why not? The 525hp LS3 is a bulletproof mill with the “Connect and Cruise” series harness straight from GM. These combinations have made life easy for builders worldwide. The T-56 Tremec 6-speed with LS7 clutch, give it the ability to accelerate unbelievably quick.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

A Rick’s Tanks stainless steel fuel tank feeds the beast and includes GM factory internals. That growl I heard when Steve broke the tires loose is courtesy of 3-inch EBMC exhaust system, X-Pipes (fabbed by EBMC) and Magnaflow mufflers.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

DJ Design in SSF handled full interior using Recaro heated/cooled seats, Dakota Digital HDX instruments, black leather and micro suede with white stitching, and a Pioneer sound system/NAV system. There is no carpet on the floor. It’s covered in a black custom canvas material which looks better than carpet. The handmade center console, Vintage Air system with custom machined vents, and a Marquez Design one piece headliner give this cab all the “wow” it will ever need. Brad looks out of tinted glass all around.

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

1967 Chevy Stepside, EBMC, Fuel Curve

We applaud Keefer and Brown on this effort. You do not see Pro-Touring Chevy Stepside trucks. With the gauntlet thrown down, maybe you will start to see more!

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