Hellcrate Hellcat Hemi, Fuel Curve

Hellcrate This: Hellcat Hemi-powered Dream Machines

Repowering vintage rides with modern horsepower is more tempting than ever thanks to crate engine programs from the big three. Good news for Mopar fans is that Hellcat-level supercharged Hemi horsepower is now available factory direct in the Hellcrate. The proven, monstrous 6.2-liter supercharged Hemi engine assembly combined with factory engineered components is good for 707-horsepower. The mapped Powertrain Control Module to accelerator pedal make Hellcat power part of the Mopar crate engine portfolio for the first time.

Hellcrate this, Fuel Curve

The Hellcrate Engine Kit also features a fuel pump control module, engine and chassis wiring harness, power distribution center with ground jumper as well as oxygen and charge air temperature sensors. An available Front End Accessory Drive (FEAD) kit can help sort out custom alternator, power steering pump, belt and pulley setups. The idea of swapping a factory-backed supercharged 707-horsepower crate engine that twists out 650 lb-ft of torque into most anything with wheels got us Fuel Curvers scheming about what Mopar we would shoehorn a Hellcrate into if we could. Here are a few machines we would like to Hellcrate down the road.

Hellcrate this, Fuel Curve

Order your Hellcrate at www.moparhemicrate.com. Travco, TK and TK not included.

Travco Hellcrate Motorhome Experience – Mike Bumbeck

With streamlined good looks, lightweight fiberglass body construction and Dodge underpinnings the Travco is the obvious choice for a Hellcrate swap that brings the seemingly disparate factory crate engine and tiny home trends together into a high-performance motorhome. Originally known as the Dodge Frank Motorhome the mighty Travco were built on modified medium-duty Dodge truck chassis from 1964 right into 1980 and available in sizes from the compact 21-foot Travco 210 out to the 32-foot Travco 320. Configurations ranged from thrifty to luxurious and the popular 27-foot 270 was the basis for the high-end Travco Dodge Mahal.

Hellcrate this, Fuel Curve

Resourceful drag racers and street demons alike have known for years that recreational vehicles are a great source for big block Mopar V8 engines and the Travo was available with anything from the Polyspherical 318 up to the mighty 413 and 440 cubic inch big block wedges. If the chassis and powertrain are heavy-duty enough for big block Mopower then surely a Hellcrate would not only fit but add considerable performance to the Travco motorhome experience. A brown on brown Travco 210 shorty with a 707-horsepower Hellcrate and 8-speed automatic would make for outstanding supercharged motorhome travel on the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways.

Hellcrate ’57 Plymouth Belvedere – John Drummond

Hellcrate this, Fuel Curve

Nothing comes close to a stanced ’57 Plymouth in my opinion. I am speaking from personal experience as I had a black ’57 Belvedere back in 1992 (that’s me at age 24). It was lowered by cranking those factory torsion bars all the way down and it looked bitchin’ with brushed Centerlines. It was a fun car but with a Hellcrate Hemi swap it would simply be epic. That old Polyspherical 318 was a little tired when I let it go back in ’94.

With a 707hp blower motor, the factory pushbutton torqueflight would have to go by the wayside but how cool would it be to rig up that newfangled 8-speed automatic to the underside of the pushbutton console? You’d have to call Morrison or Roadster Shop for a custom frame so you could reasonably control and use all that additional power. Keep the rear wheels at 11 or 12” width so the new Hellcrate power would enable me to boil the balonies at will. Maybe I could have one of my friends in the custom wheel business do a special set of solids for it as a modern era compliment to the old Centerlines.

A Pro-Touring ‘57 Belvedere? Yes please!

Senior Editor, Digital Media

With three decades of automotive journalism under his belt, John Drummond serves as Senior Editor – Digital Media for Fuel Curve and Goodguys Rod & Custom Association where he has worked since 1990. Drummond got his start in motorsports reporting by making a fake press pass to gain starting line access. The ruse worked and he began covering auto races as far back as 1986 in Northern California, eventually getting his stories published worldwide. He has owned and driven everything from a 1957 Plymouth Belvedere to a ridiculously modded Subaru WRX as well as a string of Mercedes AMG’s, most of which had the warranties voided the day after leaving the dealership.

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