Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

Stance and Style – Mike’s Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup

Mike Krumman, owner of that killer orange Chevy stepside we featured, has another truck we fell in love with – his Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup. While it’s a couple decades older than his Chevy and certainly not quite as shiny, it’s way bitchin’.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

While it might not have received the same sort of attention as his other build, this is still a truck that oozes style, appealing to those who appreciate traditionally styled old school hot rod pickups.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

Aired out on the grass, we took in all the details of the Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup. You’ll notice right away that it’s sitting on some old school Ford wires, also from 1936, with Coker white walls to finish off the vintage look.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

With a small bit of appropriate paintwork and pinstriping, Mike’s nailed the look. A Wooden bed, louvers in the rear, spade-tipped Lakester-style headers, and an old-school flathead up front, it has big time curb appeal.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

The engine is an 8BA from 1949 and while not the most powerful V8 around, it looks right at home here. Painted red, the block itself is the only part of the truck that’s wearing fresh colors, helping the flathead stand out. The Edelbrock 94 triple-carb setup is topped with intake stacks to complete the aggressive look of the low-down pickup.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

Power from the 70-year-old powerplant is sent through a T5 5-speed transmission that’s been poached from an S-10. The rear end from the pickup came with it, delivering torque out to those old school wire wheels.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve


You might have noticed an alternator poking out of the front, too, which helps power the guts inside the cab that make this thing an even better cruiser. Pop open the glove box and you’ll find the truck’s only modern touch, a head unit to provide some tunes, surrounded by stickers from a few meets and events the truck has made it out to.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

Here, inside the pickup, you’ll find a mix of vintage bits and makeshift solutions. The look is right for the build, especially that inconveniently long shifter topped off with a Cleatus knob. The seats are really just a 3-inch foam pad covered in a Mexican-style blanket. It’s not all supposed to make sense, is it?

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

All of the work was done by Mike himself, and that includes all of the suspension work to get the truck to sit on the ground. The front is a 3-inch dropped super bell axle finished with Posies reversed eye springs. Out back the truck has a custom four-link with, of course, a set of airbags. Stopping power is solved up front with a set of ’40 Ford parts complete with Buick finned drums. Meanwhile out back the S-10 brakes came over with the rear axle.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel Curve

Mike’s owned the pickup for nearly fifteen years now and he started modifying it right when he brought it home. He says his favorite thing about the truck as it sits now is that he doesn’t have to worry about dings or scratches when he takes it out for a drive. It’s a totally unique and personal build; just look at the tailgate latches which are actually the original brake and clutch pedals.

Rat Rod 1936 Ford Pickup, Fuel CurveMike always loved the look of the ’35 – ’37 truck cabs and he’s definitely made this one his own. All old cars and trucks have character, but this one is a character brought to life by Mike Krumman.

Trevor Ryan is a track day photographer from Northern California. He has experience in many different areas of photography but always comes back to automotive work in the end. To him, nothing is more rewarding than creating an amazing image of a car. Having purchased a ’66 Mustang almost six years ago, he had no choice but to end up immersed in car culture sooner or later. He also owns a ’99 Miata that he takes to the track. He has love for every part of car culture and besides track days often makes it to drift events, Cars and Coffee, tuner shows, and anything else he can find.

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