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Sam Castronova’s 1979 C10 Reps the Squarebody Syndicate

Sam Castronova’s 1979 C10 caught our attention when we saw it laid out on the deck at a recent Goodguys event. Sam’s hot hauler was part of the Squarebody Syndicate booth and we instantly set up this photo shoot the same day.

sam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curve

sam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curve

Sam is a dedicated tribe member of the Arizona-based ‘Syndicate – a group founded and headed by Joe Yezzi. We say “based” in Arizona as that is where both Sam and Joe (along with close to one hundred other syndicate members) live and build their bitchin’ square body Chevy trucks. But the ‘Syndicate is global. Putting their unique sticker on your ’73-’87 C10 is akin to a badge of honor. These guys have a movement going that is gathering steam faster than any other next-gen club or group.

sam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curve

For Sam, his affinity for square body C10’s runs deep. In his words, he builds Chevy trucks as an “extreme hobby”. “I build ‘em, ‘drive em, and sell ‘em. Some of his other builds have included a “Poncho” ‘57 GMC, and that crazy cool ‘68 Chevy C20 service body C10 he built in 2015.

sam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curve

This ’79 C10 Custom Deluxe is his latest baby. Sporting its OEM light saddle tan coat, this truck was transformed from mundane to magnificent using all the right parts while staying true to the factory essentials. All of the badging and trim is OEM as is the houndstooth bench seat though it was freshened with new vinyl. The factory tilt column allows for smooth cruisin’. The custom Syndicate Series gauges are part of the Squarebody Syndicate’s growing parts line.

sam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curvesam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curvesam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curve

But this build is anchored by the latest and greatest square body aftermarket parts and some killer fab work by Hubcaps Hot Rods of Deer Valley, AZ. The chassis is Roadster Shop’s ’73-’87 C10 SPEC Series equipped with AccuAir I-Level control and their VT Tanks neatly concealed in a special compartment beneath the bed. Sam stressed what a good job Hubcaps Hot Rods did in making and massaging the inner fenders – an extreme task considering the truck’s new rocker-dragging ride height. Wilwood discs on the corners are hidden by the epic wheels. Seriously – these “Squares” as Sam calls them are one off’s from Delmo’s Speed with hubcaps machined to match the OEM offerings. They measure 22×9” front 22×10” out back.

sam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curve

Under that heavy metal hood is another Delmo’s Speed signature item – their DelS3 V8 “prettied” up to look old school. The valve covers hide the LS3 coil packs and the old school air cleaner and intake manifold conceal Holley EFI and fuel rails.

sam castronova's 1979 c10, fuel curve

All buttoned up, Sam’s Custom Deluxe is so bitchin’ it makes C10 lovers weep and bow down in praise when it rolls by mere centimeters off the ground. Count us as worshippers of this terrific truck. You’re gonna see a lot more of these square body sensations as hot rodding takes a leap to the next generation.

Senior Editor, Digital Media

With three decades of automotive journalism under his belt, John Drummond serves as Senior Editor – Digital Media for Fuel Curve and Goodguys Rod & Custom Association where he has worked since 1990. Drummond got his start in motorsports reporting by making a fake press pass to gain starting line access. The ruse worked and he began covering auto races as far back as 1986 in Northern California, eventually getting his stories published worldwide. He has owned and driven everything from a 1957 Plymouth Belvedere to a ridiculously modded Subaru WRX as well as a string of Mercedes AMG’s, most of which had the warranties voided the day after leaving the dealership.

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