The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

The Congregation Show 2018 – A Stylish Showcase of Vintage Iron

The Congregation Show is in it’s second year and man what a follow up to last year’s event. It was also my second year bringing a knife to a gun fight, so to speak. You see, this is a bike show where the promoters are nice enough to let some of their four wheeled cousins attend. Prism Supply & Dice Magazine put on the show while The Rodder’s Journal was responsible for the automotive side.

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel CurveThe Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

My entry was a 1933 Ford Sedan (below left), which belongs to my father. I just never bother to give it back to him since just recently making it road worthy after its nearly 30-year slumber. Locally built here in North Carolina in late ‘70s it has remained largely unchanged since then, making this the perfect come back party. My photography assistant, the lovely Mr. VanSickle, was also invited to bring his ’32 Ford 5-Window. This car has a long history of its own, dating back to the late ‘60s where it terrorized the local NJ drag strips by his father.

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

Our Congregation weekend started on Friday with load-in and set up. The grounds of Camp North End is the perfect venue for such an event. Pulling in, you’re met with a huge array of old brick buildings with a large water tower overlooking the entrance. You immediately get an industrial vibe from the place. The show is housed in the main building which dates back to 1924. Once upon a time it was a Ford assembly plant for Model Ts and As along with Hercules cruise missiles in the 50s.

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve


The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel CurveThe Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

Pulling into the 240,000 square-foot building and onto the end cut wood floor gives you the feeling you’re in one of those movies where a bunch of kids with killer fast cars somehow live in a multi-million-dollar warehouse……that nobody uses. Later that evening our hosts put on a pre-party with free drinks and food for the attendees, offering a chance for everyone to meet, greet and swap stories with the customary embellishments. This may be why the show doesn’t start ‘til 2pm on Saturday…….

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

Bill and myself rolled in a little early on Saturday so we could check out all the bikes before the crowd showed up. I have to admit, when it comes to bikes I’m like that guy strolling around the lingerie shop trying to pick out something for his girlfriend. I know what it’s for, just don’t know what it is. Choppers, bobbers, board trackers and sport bikes, there was something there for everyone.

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

As we moved closer the start of the show, I thought my day couldn’t get any better until a new acquaintance of mine arrived. He drove down from Asheville for the day in his Pantera. Since we were all kicked out of the building while the Fire Marshal was doing his inspection, we decided to walk out to the parking lot and check out this low mileage beauty. To my surprise he tossed me the keys muttering “take it around the block, do whatever you want with it, just find me a better parking spot”. Not wanting the waste an opportunity, Bill and I hopped in and took off. I’ll just say, I want one now. Not that I never wanted one before, but now I really want one, found him a much better parking spot to boot.

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel CurveThe Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

Show time! The vendors were finally all set up with their cool swag and bike parts, along with a decent swap meet outside. Even though we had been there since 10am or so, walking around checking out all the bikes felt like an exclusive preview. It’s a completely different atmosphere when the space is filled with people. As nice as it is to be there without the spectators, it felt like something was missing. Not to mention bike and car folks like to gossip. Shows are really about the people – a chance to meet new groups and catch up with the ones that don’t live close. These choppers, bobbers, hot rods and gassers are just an outlet for creativity and community. Do your own thing, your own way, but find some friends to share it with.

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

Like all good things, it had to come to an end. Load out is way more chaotic than set up since everyone pretty much leaves at the same time. Our consolation prize for a day that’s done? The sound of a bikes and hot rods firing up inside a huge building. It was bitchin’.

The Congregation Show 2018, Fuel Curve

‘Til next year!

The Congregation Show Photo Extra!

Born and raised in the racing-rich confines of Charlotte, North Carolina, Robert McCarter is a lifelong car nut. His life revolves around it. Best of all, he is self-taught in all of his disciplines. Creative photography came first. Automotive concept design came soon after. He also possesses old world hot rod craftsman abilities reflected in his hi-level upholstery work. Evenings and weekends are solely dedicated to driving, tuning and tweaking his homebuilt ’32 Ford roadster or his pristine ’66 Nova. His deuce roadster has traversed the country on numerous coast-to-coast hair-blowing boogies. He now adds story-teller to his repertoire with his editorial work reflected her on our pages.

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